Category Archives: Training

Hill circuit (hills)

Hill circuit (hills)

Note this hill circuits uses the format devised by Arthur Lydiard but not the original plyometric drills as ChampionsEverywhere take a different view on which plyometric drills develop the actual natural running pattern most effectively. Hill training generally, including the Lydiard hill circuit, helps the athlete transition from the aerobic phase into the anaerobic phase…

Strides (relaxed sprinting/stride-outs)

Strides (relaxed sprinting/stride-outs)

Strides are generally 10-25 second (50-150m for most runners) controlled sprints. Where aerobic runs focus on the cardiovascular system and anaerobic runs the metabolic system, strides improve neuromuscular coordination (the brain’s ability to fire motor units in muscles quickly and efficiently). Strides can be employed with benefits throughout all phases of your training programme. The…

Windsprints (sharpeners)

Windsprints are shorter anaerobic interval sessions introduced when it is still necessary to do some anaerobic training but advisable to drop the volume and increase the intensity. They are used for sharpening and becoming accustomed to changes in pace in racing. “If you run 20×400 metres, you will be at it a long time and…

Intervals (repetitions)

Interval training is a distance workout of faster repetitions, usually run well above your maximal steady state and your lactate threshold, with a recovery interval between each. The aim is to do enough “tiring, exacting work” (as Lydiard referred to it) to lower your systemic (full-body) pH as much as possible without the workout being…

Recovery run

This article used to refer to “Jog”. We have removed references to jogging on our site. Although this is a common term for slower running it also is synonymous with the damaging hybrid movement between walking and running that modern running shoes allow. We therefore prefer the term “Recovery run” as while you run slower,…

Fartlek (speedplay)

Fartlek is a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic running without any set structure for when you decide to put in hard efforts. Likewise you can vary the exact intensity and length of faster running any way you want. Instruction: Warm-up 10 – 15 minutes Run the whole gamut of paces over an undulating area such…

Long aerobic run

The long aerobic run is the cornerstone of all our training programmes and the most important run of the week throughout the General and Related phases and also often into the Specific phase. It builds the foundation for every other training workout you undertake and maintains general fitness during the Competitive period. Instruction:  Run comfortably…

Medium long run (Aerobic run)

Aerobic runs or Medium Long Runs form the backbone of all our training programmes.  They are high priority runs throughout the aerobic phase, where they play a key part in building the highest possible peak for later racing. In the strength, anaerobic, coordination and taper phases, they are lower priority workouts that serve to help…

Rate of perceived effort (RPE)

Rate of perceived effort (RPE)

Rate of perceived effort (or exertion) simply provides a subjective way for you to describe how hard you would rate a given workout after having performed it or, sometimes such as during exercise tests, during the actual workout itself. The system was first popularised by my namesake Dr. Borg (no relation) who discovered that a…

Race (non-peak/tune-up)

Test races are over and under-distance races that help you to gauge your form, practice race tactics and gather information about your weaknesses and strengths ahead of your peak race. Long test races should be high-end aerobic running, bordering into anaerobic, not all-out efforts. Test races are sometimes referred to as “tune-up races” because that…

The Five Principles of Lydiard Training

If any coach has been more misinterpreted than Lydiard, I’d be surprised. – Graeme Woodward, Coaching Coordinator of the Fell Runners Association Simply taking a Lydiard training programme and reading through his books often does not give you the full understanding of the principles behind his method to make the right decisions during your training.…

Cut-downs

Cut-downs are sprint sessions where the sprint pace increases for each repeat as the athlete works on improving their speed and form. Instruction:  Warm-up by jogging easily for minimum of 15 minutes Run fast 3 times over approximately 100m, increasing the speed each time Take 2-3 minutes easy recovery jog to regain your breath and…

Lydiard coach

A Lydiard coach can refer to any coach who purports to use the Lydiard methodology as the basis of their training. However, in recent years the Lydiard Foundation has prepared a training seminar with the aim of allowing coaches to attain “Lydiard certification”. The Lydiard coaching certification exists independently of the coaching education provided by…

Anaerobic phase

To be written.

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